Old Campgrounds: First Defenders Preservation Efforts


 
Amount Raised in Our 20th Campaign:

20th Campaign Amount Donated for Preservation to Date:

20th Campaign Total Donation (including all matching funds):

TOTAL RAISED FOR PRESERVATION IN ALL CAMPAIGNS:
        $ 705.00

        $ 850.00

     $ 2,330.00

   $ 29,716.00
   
Gettysburg Preservation Effort

The First Defenders decided in November to contribute to the Civil War Trust campaign focusing on preserving 35 acres that saw the clash of Federal 11th Corps and Confederate Second Corps troops just north of Gettysburg.

The land today is just west of the Harrisburg Pike and due south of Barlow's Knoll, an area dotted with monuments to the men who fought and died in these fields on July 1, 1863. 

Our contribution was made in two parts: first, $300 was donated in memory of long-time member Dennis Yerger who died this past summer.  His family generously asked that friends consider making gifts in Dennis' memory to the Round Table, and it was determined these gifts should be used for some type of "Gettysburg Project."  A total of $300 was donated for this purpose.

The Round Table added another $200 to the Civil War Trust contribution. 

This combined total of $500 benefited from a 2:1 Civil War Trust match which means the First Defenders donation resulted in a total of $1,000 raised for this important preservation effort.
   
Saving the Old Dominion

The First Defenders contributed $100 to the Civil War Trust's campaign to preserve 313 acres of land at five different Virginia battlefields including Gaines' Mill, Ream's Station, Sailor's Creek, White Oak Road and Williamsburg.  These sites witnessed some of the most critical and significant fighting in the Eastern Theatre in 1862 and 1864.  The Old Dominion campaign boasted at match of $10.80 to $1, which means the Round Table contribution added a total of $1,080 to the Trust's efforts!
   
Third Winchester

The Shenandoah Valley of Virginia includes some of the most beautiful country in the United States, but by 1864 the bucolic rural landscape had been trampled by opposing armies for more than two years.  Yet the worst was yet to come in the fall of that year during a time still known as "The Burning."  At the outset of that campaign was the Third Battle of Winchester, a strategic union victory.  However, much of the land over which the armies fought is unprotected and suffering from both urban and commercial blight.  The Shenandoah Valley Battlefield Association is working hard to preserve the key sites of the battle, and the First Defenders chipped in $100 to aid in that effort.
   
Helping Pamplin Park to Grow

Pamplin Park is situated on land that saw some of the most savage and desperate fighting during the final nine months of the Civil War as Grant and Lee settled into siege warfare around Petersburg.  Pamplin Park represents possibly the most exquisite example of private battlefield preservation and development of educational resources.  The First Defenders have been fortunate to have several of Pamplin's staff members present to Round Tables, and this year donated $150 to the Park as an extra thanks to our September speaker, Edward Alexander.